About Jerry Genesio

IMG14 (2)-2Jerry Genesio is a second generation Italian-American whose grandparents emigrated from Piacenza in the Emilia-Romagna Region of northern Italy. Leaving at the dawn of the 20th Century, they followed the promise of a brighter future beckoning from a far shore. Jerry was born in Framingham and raised on a hog farm in Milford, Massachusetts. His father died when he was twelve, and three years later his mother sold the farm. Shortly after graduating from high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps and served six years. He was honorably discharged with the rank of sergeant (E-5). Following several years of surf fishing and construction jobs along the coast of North Carolina he returned to New England settling in Maine where he was hired by a west coast, human biological products  company and trained as a human blood specialist representing the firm in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont.

In 1984, during the Contra counter-revolution in Nicaragua, Jerry served on the first Maine Witness for Peace delegation where he confirmed that the company he was working for had been importing raw blood plasma from Centro America de Plasmaferesis, a blood harvesting operation partially owned by the then deposed Nicaraguan President Anastasio Somoza, which had helped to provoke the Sandinista revolution of the 1970s. When he returned, Jerry founded a military veterans humanitarian aid organization in 1985 that was granted United Nations non-governmental organization status and was dedicated to providing medical and humanitarian aid to the thousands of Nicaraguan children who had been victimized by the war. Nearly a decade later, Jerry founded the Children of War Rescue Project, which helped to evacuate and provided medical/surgical care for nearly a hundred Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian, and Kosovan children wounded in the wars among the former Yugoslavian republics.

From the mid-1980s to the early 1990s Jerry attended night classes at the University of Southern Maine earning a B.A. in History. When peace came to the new nations that were once part of Yugoslavia, Jerry went to work at the Portland Public Library in Portland, Maine, as a Maine historian and special collections assistant. He finally retired in 2003 and now lives in Scarborough, Maine, where he spends most of his time immersed in research and writing projects.

For many years, Jerry served as an area correspondent for The Bridgton (Maine) News, and the Lewiston (Maine) Sun-Journal. He has written dozens of articles for periodicals such as Yankee, New England Outdoors, Mother Earth News, BitterSweet,  and MaineLife.  And he has published five books including Veterans for Peace: The First Decade (1998); Unseen Hazards That Threaten Hunters, Campers, and Hikers: What you should know about pathogens commonly found in wildlife (2009); Portland Neck: The Hanging of Thomas Bird (2010); Stoking the Embers of War (2011); and Lamb’s Blood (2012). In addition, he has created two blogs: Natural Unseen Hazards http://naturalunseenhazards.wordpress.com/ , and Lamb’s Blood http://lambsbloodblog.wordpress.com/ , as well as the Afghanistan-Iraq Memorial Wall https://pinterest.com/jgenesio/ .

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3 thoughts on “About Jerry Genesio

  1. Mr. Genesio,

    My name is Sean and I recently found your Iraq and Afghanistan Pinterest pages. I am following you under the name of Chad McGreevy. I served in the United States Army as an Officer with the 3rd Squadron 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment. I just wanted to say thank you for your efforts and what you do. The memories of the men we lost will stay with me forever and finding their pictures on your pages was appreciated.

    Thank you,

    Sean

  2. Hello Jerry:
    My name is JOE FIGUEROA
    I am a former us marine ,in fact second generation marine .
    I was born in Puerto Rico and as any and every other puertorican us citizen by birth ,according to the Jones Act.
    I am highly impressed and honored by the fact that a mainland born american created an Iraq/Afghanistan wall ,honoring and remembering puertorican servicemen and women kia’s. It shows that there are fellow american citizens educated ,and knowledgeable enough that recon and give credit to our American soldiers born in the island.
    May God bless you always.
    JF

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